We are AAHA Accredited!

AAHA Accreditation means that we are dedicated to providing the highest level of care to your four-legged family. Stop in soon to experience the Animal Doctor difference!

At Animal Doctor we have the ability to perform a wide range of procedures. Anything from a routine spay or neuter to complicated dental disease can be addressed in our modern, up to date facilities.


Our veterinarians and support staff strive to make your pet as comfortable and relaxed as possible. Each one of our surgical technicians have been trained in proper methods of obtaining blood samples, placing IV catheters, and monitoring anesthetized patients.








What you can expect on the day of your scheduled surgical procedure:


1. Due to your pet being placed under general anesthesia, we ask you to fast them overnight to limit the chance of vomiting. Vomiting while under anesthesia can lead to serious complications, such as aspiration pneumonia.

2. Between 7:30 and 8:00 am you will leave your pet with us for the day. You will be greeted by the surgery technician, and at that time we can answer any questions you may have and you will be asked to choose between several different options we offer here:

 






























3. Your pet will receive a full physical examination performed by a veterinarian to ensure they are healthy prior to surgery.

4. If you elect to do blood work on your pet, a blood sample will be obtained once the physical examination is completed. Once blood work is completed, a veterinarian will review the results and formulate an appropriate anesthetic protocol.

5. All of our patients receive “pre-medication”. This consists of one or more injectable anesthetics to help lower the anxiety your pet is experiencing prior to inducing anesthesia.

6. A catheter will be placed, if elected, once the pre-medications take effect.

7. The injectable induction anesthetic will be given and an endotracheal tube will be placed. Endotracheal intubation is an important factor in the administration of gas anesthesia and it will protect your pets’ airway, limiting the chance of aspiration.

8. The surgical procedure is performed by one of our skilled veterinarians.

9. Your pet will then recover from anesthesia while being constantly monitored by the veterinarian and surgical technician.

10. Once your pet is awake, you will receive a phone call from the surgical technician. Most patients are allowed to go home the same afternoon.

11. Discharge instruction and any medications will be sent home with you when your pet is discharged.






What to expect when you get your pet home:

Most patients are tired for the remainder of the day, but should “bounce back” within 1-2 days of the procedure.  We recommend keeping your pet in a safe, quite space until completely recovered. It is ok to give your pet a small, bland meal at dinner time, and resume normal feeding the next day.







Surgical & Dental Procedures:
What to Expect


Bloodwork
is recommended for all patients and is required for patients over the age of 7 years.  Blood work prior to going under general anesthesia allows us to customize our protocol to each individual patient.

Routine pre-anesthetic blood work:

Complete Blood Count (CBC): allows us to look at red blood cell and white blood cell counts to assess for infection, anemia, or any other problems associated with these cell lines.

Chemistry Profile: allows us to look at organ function as well as electrolyte balances to assess kidney and liver health as well as diagnose certain endocrine diseases such as diabetes mellitus etc.

                        “Senior Testing”: >7 years

Complete Blood Count (CBC): allows us to look at red blood cell and white blood cell counts to assess for infection, anemia or any other problems associated with these cell lines.

Chemistry Profile: allows us to look at organ function as well as electrolyte balances to assess kidney and liver health as well as diagnose certain endocrine diseases such as diabetes mellitus etc.

Thyroxine (T4): allows us to assess for hyper- or hypo-thyroidism

                                              ** Hyperthyroidism – most common in cats

                                              **Hypothyroidism – most common in dogs

Urinalysis: allows us to assess for any bacterial infections, the presence of crystals and better assess the function of the kidneys.

IV Catheter/Fluids are recommend for all patients but are required for patients over the age of 7 years.

Patients commonly experience a drop in blood pressure while under anesthesia, for that reason we recommend IV fluids to be run during all procedures. This drop in blood pressure can affect many body systems, most notably the kidneys. Permanent kidney damage may occur if blood pressure slows for an extended amount of time.

                        Digital Dental Radiographs are available for patients receiving a dental cleaning

Radiographs are recommend for all patients, and may be required by our veterinarians if your pets’ dental disease is severe.Teeth are like icebergs, we can only see about 10% of the tooth with the rest being hidden under the gum line. Radiographs (x-rays) are the best way for us to determine if an individual tooth is healthy enough to stay in the mouth.  We offer radiographs per view OR full mouth radiographs

            Per- view:  we will take an x-ray of a single tooth in question (example: a fractured tooth or a tooth with excessive gingivitis). If you elect this option, the price will never exceed that of full mouth radiographs.



** Regardless of the procedure being performed, patients will experience varying degrees of pain. Most of our patients receive an injectable pain medication prior to/during the procedure and will be sent home with several days of pain medication. **


Please call us if you have any further questions, would like to schedule a surgery, or have any post-surgery concerns!